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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
. domestic discretionary funding is the money that's used to keep the government operating each year. f.b.i. agents investigating case -gs, border patrol eights working our -- border patrol agents working our borders, employees mailing out social security checks and many other important programs and functions. it's already at its lowest level since a shared g.d.p. since the 1950's. it's hard to imagine any other federal investment not being jeopardized by such draconian cuts. and that is why president reagan -- president reagan's former economic advisor said about this ryan budget plan, "the ryan plan is a monstrosity." the reagan economic advisor. ronald reagan's economic advisor said "the ryan plan is a monstrosity. the rich would receive huge tax cuts while the social safety net would be shredded to pay for them. it is less of a wish list than a fairy tale, you utterly disconnd from the real world, backed up by make-believe numbers and unreasonable assumptions." if that's what ronald reagan's economic advisor thought about it, think what regular people might think about it. ryan's plan i
in benghazi? and to that, the fbi says it is too dangerous to be in benghazi why none of them are there now. is that because the situation has worsened or was the always that dangerous in benghazi? >> i think, on the terrorist attack i mean, as we determined the details of what took place there, and how that, attack took place, that it became clear that there were terrorists who had planned that attack and that's when i came to that conclusion. as again, as to who was involved, what specific groups were involved, i think the investigation that is ongoing hopefully will determine that. >> a day after or, was -- >> took a while to really get some of the feedback from what exactly happened at that location. >> there was a thread of intelligence reporting that that groups in the environment in western, correction, eastern libya were seeking to coalesce but there wasn't anything specific and certainly not a specific threat to the consulate that i'm aware of. and, as far as to the risks that the fbi reported to you, really have to ask them for why they made that determination. i don't know. >> wa
can create. a law enforcement fbi justice department's role to investigate those domestic terrorism, homeland security is more responsible for guarding our borders, northern, southern people coming by water and people coming by air as well as a lot of coordination with local law enforcement. so they have some law enforcement responsibilities, but if you are talking about giving and investigating a group you think may -- >> host: embrey to jump in because we need to go to the white house where they are going to do a moment of silence we want to listen and watch and come back to the discussion. [background noise] [background noise] [background noise] ♪ ♪ ♪ [background noise] >> a moment of silence this morning at the white house with the president and the first lady. you heard the bells rang at 8:46 eastern time when they were struck by their plan the 11 years ago on the september 11th 2001. nearly 3,000 americans died that day with the attacks of the world trade center, and the attacks of the pentagon here in washington. our cameras are up in new york where the world trade cent
and the fbi, and lying about and thrown overboard his closest aides one after another in an attempt to save himself. so that was an astonishing time. i do think that we learned a lot about hubris during the course of watergate and we have to be on constant alert for as for the most intriguing president, it will be impossible for me to say. they all brought such interesting qualities to the job. it's the hardest thing in the world to do, is to run successfully for president. a lot of people have not been successful, and it's in part because they simply were not up to it. those who eventually get to the oval office, however successful or unsuccessful they may have been in her administration, always bring unique qualities to the assignment of being a candidate. >> host: where we on august 9, 1974? >> guest: the white house lawn. i was in san clemente when the supreme court decision came down, and -- >> host: with the president. >> guest: with the president. he was out there at the time but it was an explosive development. we in effect knew it was over at that point, because if the tapes were c
as criminals and the president first called in the fbi to deal with the challenge as if it was a criminal matter >> the question before i turn out to you guys is what have -- what would have been wrong with the president coming to the rose garden and saying i am horrified by what has happened in egypt and obviously horrified by what has been done in libya. the safety and security is my foremost responsibility. but i would like to stand here and remind the people of egypt and the president and the prime minister and acting prime minister of libya that american lives were laid on the line for you on the one side, and we supported your efforts on the other side. we stand with countries that stand with the rule of law and you need to understand that you need to do the same for us. thank you very much to the time we'd be looking into this and walk away. rather than the sort of, you know, excuse making about islam. would that have been wrong for the president to do that? >> actions speak louder than words. they are also sending the military. you can disagree the fact there was in the military a
guardia to of course you may have floated airports that bears his name, and at the time, new fbi director j. edgar hoover. they both have spoken at westminster college because bullets audacious invitations. a churchill, winston churchill was in another category altogether. bullet was confident of his success, but needed even with truman so it was still a longshot. after all, churchill received dozens of invitations every month asking them to come and grace colleges like harvard and stanford and oxford with his presence. most of them he turned down, if, in fact, got to him past his army secretary's. but when churchill red mccluer's note, he got to the pot and he saw truman to dinner, he knew that this was it. this was his opportunity. the president of the united states introducing churchill in his home state, the world would have to be watching and listening. so despite this, boiler mact were, westminster college had done it. churchill and truman were coming to form in march 1946. unfortunately bullet mccluer didn't know what he bargained for. it seemed pretty easy to write a letter answer a nice g
, high-ranking member of the f.b.i., director of national intelligence, general clapper and the vice chairman of the joint chiefs of staff to tell us ostensibly what happened in the tragic death of christopher -- ambassador christopher stevens and three other brave americans. so we gathered down in the secret room, which everybody turns in their phones and blackberries, and we went in and listened to basically a description of america's military disposition in that part of the world, something which certainly does not warrant a super secret briefing. but more importantly than that, when the secretary and the others were asked exactly what happened, what happened here, what caused this tragedy? what was the sequence of events? in fact, it was senators, the ranking member of the intelligence committee, what happened? the answer was, well, that's still an ongoing investigation, and we can't tell you anything. we were supposed to be down there to hear what happened, to hear the administration's version of events of what happened. we were told nothing. we were told absolutely nothing. and
in washington, chief of staff to the fbi director robert meueller and he began the justice department lawyer to fill the position as the attorney general for national security he then served as the homeland security adviser to president george w. bush and is now in private practice in washington. ken, please. spec the panel starts off with a reference to playboy magazine, but i will see if i can catch my breath and go forward. thanks very much, pete. good to be here. i've been asked to talk about three cases. 1i guess you could call a national security case and then number to a more regular case. let me start with the national security case and that is called blabber versus amnesty international. it's actually standing case but it's a standing case relating to a challenge to what's called the fisa amendment act passed in 2008, and was an amendment through a very substantial amount of the foreign intelligence surveillance act passed in 1978, and to understand the standing issue of the stakes at play you have to understand the merits a little bit so let me get into them. >> for those watching
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)